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The Seven Steps to Beginning Curriculum for The Young Reader

Each month we will be featuring a different part of the Seven Steps. If you miss any of the parts or just want to go back and re-read a part, just click on the links below .

1. Strategies For a Positive Mind (August 2005)
2. Writing Plain and Clear (September 2005)
3. Vocabulary By Example (October 2005)
4. Spelling In Parts (November 2005)
5. Listening With Feedback (December 2005)
6. Comprehension Puzzle (January 2006)
7. Phonemic Awareness (March 2006)

COMPREHENSION PUZZLE

Comprehension begins with the family circle. This family circle sets the example of ways to increase intelligent retention by exposing children to new interests, situations, study habits, and interactive language/reading communication. The earlier a child is exposed to thinking skills, the easier the retention and logical thinking is in a school environment. The COMPREHENSION PUZZLE comes together into one big picture that is clear with understanding.

Comprehension comes by example and practice. Children are born with unique characters, talents, and modes of learning. One thing is true; all children observe their family circle and copy their ways of communicating and their interactive problem solving methods mentally and physically.

The family circle can use methods to bring out the best intelligence in any child. These suggested methods include reading out loud in a family circle, encouraging independent reading, talking over dinner, creating a balanced literacy and increasing vocabulary use in complete sentences.

1. READING OUTLOUD
2. INDEPENDENT READING
3. TALKING
4. BALANCING LITERACY & INCREASING VOCABULARY


Reading out loud is so much fun. It creates imagination, coziness, emotions, and structure in thinking. A sense that everything has a beginning, middle and end is the simple logic of comprehension. It is a family tradition that encourages relaxing with a book. Reading out loud as a daily routine shows importance and necessity to excel.

Independent reading is perfect after a trip to the library. Having a silent reading time at home prepares children for the school setting. With the head of the family reading in a chair, the child has a quiet example of how to behave with the library books.

Turning pages and examining pictures is the first copied steps to independent reading. Drawing pictures of the book’s characters or words from the book are all part of the silent comprehension building. At the end of the 10-minute quiet session, examine the pictures and question the child on what he liked in the book. Choose one word to identify in the book, write it on a chalkboard, and have your child copy that word.

Talking with your child in complete sentences about the things and situations around him creates a quick minded who can solve problems out in the open. Being compassionate in conversation and showing a genuine interest in what your child has to say gives value to interactive problem solving.

Balanced literacy involves reading repeated books and building meaning of standard language by talking about it and building vocabulary. Secondly, shared reading exposes children to the concept of print, the reading process, strategies, vocabulary, gathering knowledge, main characters, and the love of reading. Thirdly, guided reading in groups where 95% of the words are known help develop new strategies with familiar topics. Prior knowledge is needed in guided reading with a good use of high frequency words.

HIGH FREQUENCY WORD BANDITS
a
any
again
are
because
been
do
have
of
one
people
the
these
to
their
they
very
what
who
was
where
when
with
many
only
some
there
through
use
which
you
because


VOCABULARY BUILDING includes several areas.

1. Prior knowledge or semantic meaning gives sense to a story.
2. Grammatical patterns and language structure or syntactic structure gives knowledge of the English language in the comprehension puzzle.
3. Visual graphics brings sound/symbol connections to the formation of words.

These three systems overlap with each other to bring out reproduction with meaning.

Setting up a wall dictionary on the refrigerator of words pulled from the context of a repeated story will give value to the new words.

One great strategy to increase vocabulary is called CHUNKING. Chunking is making and breaking words for learning quickly. As an example you write down common letters and come up with rhyming words. Here are some common rhyming “chunking” letter groups.

ack all ain ake ale ame an ank ap ash at ate aw ay eat ell est ice
ick ide ight ill in ine ing ink ip ir ock oke op ore or uck uck ug ump unk

The COMPREHENSION PUZZLE is full of twists and challenges, but when started early in the family circle, will become a life long game of logical and creative thinking. Remember to MODEL IT!


We care about our future generation at QuickStartReading.com. If you have any questions or comments please feel free to e-mail us at questions@quickstartreading.com



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